Tooloom National Park

UPDATE; RE TOOLOOM FALLS November 21

Closed parks: Bandahngan Aboriginal Area (known as Tooloom FallsCamping area)  at Tooloom Falls, near Urbenville,  which is located near the Tooloom National park, and maintained by NPWL staff, is  currently closed till further notice.   Gate closure with sign at the reserve, not up at turn off. But you are able to leave your car near the gate and walk in to have a picnic or view the falls.

Bandahngan Aboriginal Area at Tooloom Falls is currently closed to visitors. The closure follows concerns raised by the Githabul Aboriginal Community about the site. The impacts of camping along with recent drought has killed many trees within the 2-hectare Aboriginal Area. The closure will allow NPWS to deal with the hazardous trees and work with the Githabul Community on planning for future development and uses of the area. Apologies for any inconvenience this may have on peoples plans.

Other campground areas are available in Urbenville and Woodenbong villages, and at Koreelah and Richmond Range National Park.

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Tooloom National Park encompasses the Tooloom Scrub, which is listed as part of the World Heritage ‘Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves of Australia’.
Tooloom takes its name from the nearby local landmark of Tooloom Falls. The aboriginal word for Tooloom is ‘Dooloomi’, which means headlice and relates to the aboriginal story of the falls. Tooloom Falls, located south east of the village of Urbenville, is declared an aboriginal place and is worth a visit while you are in the area.

The park contains 3 980 hectares of forest including the Hewston’s Hill and Wallaby Creek catchments and part of the Koreelah Range.

There are 10 species of kangaroos and wallabies in the park, including the threatened long-nosed potoroo.
You can enjoy a quiet picnic or go on a bushwalk. With a choice of tracks from short and easy to something more challenging, you’re sure to find one to suit your needs.

Moore Park Nature Reserve

This tiny reserve is not part of the area of the ‘Big Scrub’ but is all that remains of an area once known as Boyd’s Scrub. Several stands of gallery rainforest, including black bean and silky oak, provide habitat for a large colony of grey-headed flying-foxes and endangered black flying-foxes.

It is the most important example of black bean rainforest in NSW and is just off the Summerland Way near the locality of Old Grevillia, 26klms north of Kyogle.

You may see groups of grey-headed flying foxes hanging from tree limbs near the picnic area Their natural foods are native fruits and the blossoms and nectar of eucalypts. When the bats are in residence, please avoid disturbing them as much as possible. Birds which is may be seen include Brown capped Emerald Dove, Rose-Crowned Fruit Dove, Noisy Pitta, Bared cockatoo-shrike, Golden whistler and the Azure Kingfisher.

Tooloom National Park Copy

UPDATE; RE TOOLOOM FALLS OCTOBER 2020

Closed parks: Bandahngan Aboriginal Area at Tooloom Falls currently closed till approx June 2021.   Gate closure with sign at the reserve, not up at turn off.

Bandahngan Aboriginal Area at Tooloom Falls is currently closed to visitors. The closure follows concerns raised by the Githabul Aboriginal Community about the site. The impacts of camping along with recent drought has killed many trees within the 2-hectare Aboriginal Area. The closure will allow NPWS to deal with the hazardous trees and work with the Githabul Community on planning for future development and uses of the area. Apologies for any inconvenience this may have on peoples plans.

Other campground areas are available in Urbenville and Woodenbong villages, and at Koreelah and Richmond Range National Park.

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8/7/2020 NOTE: the Tooloom National Park and Tooloom Falls camping & day picnic area are both temp closed until December 2020 for the safety of the public,  with repair works  being done and tree felling due to recent dry weather conditions at the  Falls, and a baiting program being done in the national park.  Sorry for any inconvenience. Contact national parks office for further info 0266320000

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Tooloom National Park encompasses the Tooloom Scrub, which is listed as part of the World Heritage ‘Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves of Australia’.
Tooloom takes its name from the nearby local landmark of Tooloom Falls. The aboriginal word for Tooloom is ‘Dooloomi’, which means headlice and relates to the aboriginal story of the falls. Tooloom Falls, located south east of the village of Urbenville, is declared an aboriginal place and is worth a visit while you are in the area.

The park contains 3 980 hectares of forest including the Hewston’s Hill and Wallaby Creek catchments and part of the Koreelah Range.

There are 10 species of kangaroos and wallabies in the park, including the threatened long-nosed potoroo.
You can enjoy a quiet picnic or go on a bushwalk. With a choice of tracks from short and easy to something more challenging, you’re sure to find one to suit your needs.

Tourist Drive Number 4

Experience the lush tropical rainforests of the Gondwana Caldera, in the World Heritage listed Border Ranges National Park featuring deep gorges with waterfalls, spectacular views, sparkling creeks, steep escarpments and rugged ridges. Located 28kms north of Kyogle, access is via Lynch’s Creek Road opposite the Wiangarie General Store, which is your last chance to obtain refreshments and picnic supplies to take with you.

The Tweed Range Scenic Drive is a well maintained gravel road suitable for 2WD vehicles when dry, the eastern side of which follows the escarpment edge of the huge eroded Mt Warning (Wollumbin) Caldera.  The drive can be completed in 4-5 hours allowing for a leisurely pace with stops to enjoy views, strolls in the rainforest and picnic breaks.

If there has been consistent wet weather check road conditions by contacting the Kyogle National Parks Office 0266320000 (except weekends). The free NSW National Parks & Wildlife App is now a very good way to make bookings for park access and camping, checking up to date info on closures, park facilities and news. Free at the I Store or Google Play. Further information about any major disruptions to park conditions or maintenance is usually obtained from the National Parks website http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au or contacting the A/Hrs no for NPWL 0266270200.

Border Ranges

Richmond Range National Park

Richmond Range National Park is accessed by travelling west from Casino on the Bruxner Highway towards the small village of Mallanganee. Before reaching the village and at the top of the Mallanganee Range a sign post will direct you the National Park. It may also be accessed in dry weather by travelling west from Kyogle to Toonumbar Dam and continuing on Iron Pot Creek Road and then continuing south onto the Cambridge Plateau Forest Drive. Please note that these roads are often impassable in wet weather so please check the National Parks website http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au/alerts for details of road and other closures.

This park is renowned for its gum species, extensive old-growth forest and the World Heritage-listed rainforest of the Cambridge Plateau. These internationally significant rainforests have an outstanding diversity of native plants and animals including many rare and threatened species. One local spotted gum, related to the more common form spotted gum of the New South Wales east coast, is found only in a small area on the range.

Mount Warning National Park

World Heritage-listed Mount Warning (Wollumbin) is the remnant central plug of an ancient volcano. Wollumbin is the aboriginal name for the Mt Warning mountain complex. It is a sacred place of great significance to the people of the Bundjalung Nation. It is a traditional place of cultural lore, initiation and spiritual education.
The name Mt Warning was chosen by Captain James Cook to warn future mariners of the offshore reefs he encountered in May 1770.

Wollumbin-Mount warning is the central plug of a hugh, shield shaped volcano that twenty million years ago stretched from Mt Tamborine in the North to Lismore in the south. Westward it extended to Kyogle and its eastern remnants occur as the reefs of Point Danger.
Under Bundjalung law, only specifically chosen people are allowed to climb Wollumbin. Out of respect for their law and culture, the Bundjalung ask that you consider choosing not to climb.

This park protects the mountain summit of Wollumbin-Mount Warning, an iconic landmark of the Northern Rivers region. The mountain is the remnant central vent of an ancient volcano, and has a dual name. Captain Cook named it Mount Warning, but to the Aboriginal community it is a sacred place known as Wollumbin. Wollumbin National Park includes the former Mount Warning National Park (the two parks were combined in August 2009).
The park is 12km south-west of Murwillumbah off Kyogle Road.

Camping is not available within the National Park, though there are camping grounds nearby at the Mt Warning Caravan park- 0266795120, as well as in local villages of Murwillumbah or Uki.

Mebbin National Park

Mebbin shares its western boundary with Border Ranges National Park and forms part of the rim of the Mt Warning volcano. Mebbin National Park was created in 1999 and in 2003 the former Wollumbin State Forest was protected as Wollumbin National Park and State Conservation area.

This park is near… Murwillumbah (35 km)
Best car routes—
From Murwillumbah take the Kyogle Road through Uki, then turn right into Byrrill Creek Road. From Byrrill Creek Road turn left into Mebbin Forest Road which leads to the park boundary (about 1 kilometre), and a further kilometre into Cutters Camp
Road quality: unpaved sections

Take Brays Creek Road south from Tyalgum and turn left into Byrrill Creek Road. Keep going until you reach Mebbin Forest Road, which will take you 1 kilometre to the park boundary and another kilometre into Cutters Camp campground and picnic area.
Road quality: unpaved sections

Vehicle entry fees: In this park, vehicle entry fees are $8 per vehicle per day or a N/P annual pass. The park has coin-operated ‘pay and display’ machines – please bring correct coins. These fees are used locally to help protect the park and maintain its facilities.

Facilities and attractions with fees
Cutters camp;
Camping fees: $6 per adult per night. $3.50 per child per night.
Cutters camp (15 sites)
The campground features a walking track to Byrrill Creek. Due to the unsealed road and the layout of the campsite it is only suitable for small camper trailers or small campervans, not for full sized caravans or motor homes.

Price Range

$8 day entry fee, camping extra

Koreelah National Park

Koreelah National Park, in the north of NSW near the Queensland border, protects one of the state’s western-most rainforest areas. Pockets of World Heritage rainforest hug steep slopes below Acacia Plateau and Mount Wilson. There is a camping facility located on a small grassy area beside the Koreela Creek.

How to get there—This park is near… Kyogle (90 km) .
Best car routes—drive from Kyogle to Woodenbong. From Woodenbong, the park is located approx 30 kms west. Drive west along the Mt Lindesay Road to Old Koreelah and follow White Swamp Road (unsealed) to the park. Road quality: paved to Old Koreelah.
Park use fees apply.

Border Ranges National Park

 

From Kyogle, journey north along the Summerland Way approx 13km to Wiangaree. Here you turn right in Lynches Creek Rd, observing the signs to the Border Ranges National Park. Access includes some gravel roads. A World Heritage Listed rainforest, the Border Ranges lies on the New South Wales/Queensland border. It encompasses 31,729 hectares of scenic rainforest featuring deep gorges with waterfalls that plunge hundreds of metres. Border Rangers National Park, is located on the rim of a vast and ancient volcano and adjoins Lamington National Park in Queensland. Border Rangers National Park offers spectacular views, pristine rainforest, waterfalls, sparkling creeks, steep escarpments and rugged ridges. Bush walkers and birdwatchers flock to this park. Visitors to the park need to pay a fee for day-use (being $8 per vehicle) and an extra fee if using the camping areas. There are 4 self-service (honour system) pay stations, these are located at each entry and the camping areas.

The Tweed Scenic Drive (unsealed, but suitable for 2WD when dry) is a well-maintained 44kms of gravel road traversing through the park, from the eastern side, which follows the escarpment edge of the huge eroded Mount Warning caldera. the drive can be completed in 4-5 hours allowing for a leisurely pace with stops to enjoy views, strolls in the rainforest and picnic breaks. It provides access to incomparable views, particularly of Mount Warning. The park is a haven to native fauna such as Albert’s lyrebird and the pouched frog. The NPWS has identified 170 species of birds living in the rainforest as well as many animals, so care should be taken driving as they might cross your path.

There is camping at Sheepstation Creek Rest Area and Forest Tops Camping Area with a  camping fee involved All bookings MUST be done on line now. There are 15 sites at sheepstation Creek Camping.

  • Rates and availability are displayed when making an online booking
  • A minimum daily rate applies, which includes the first 2 occupants.
  • Daily rate: $24 per night, includes 2 people. $12 per additional adult (16+ years) per night, $6 per additional child (5-15 years) per night, infants free (0-4 years).

Daily entry fee $8.00 is still be paid upon arrival at the National park as this is separate from the camping fee, so please make sure you have correct monies.

A NPWL staff member or Ranger patrols daily. It is recommended to bring your own drinking water, and some fire wood. Fire wood supplies are available from the Caltex Service Station, Summerland Way, Kyogle for approx $11 a bag (with kindling), plus Caltex Service stations in Casino & Murwillumbah or Liberty Service Station, Lismore southside. If there has been consistant wet weather check road conditions by contacting the National Parks Office (except weekends). To check any of this info with regards to fees, road closures etc go direct to National Parks website http://www.nationalparks.nsw.gov.au.

The Pinnacle Walk and Lookout is reached by a short 200m walk through the rainforest which will bring you to this magnificent feature, which is part of the rim of the Mt Warning caldera offering you a great view. Help protect endangered plants by staying on the walking track and not going beyond the lookout platform at the Pinnacle.
Picnic areas throughout the park, include Brindle Creek Picnic Area and Antartic Beech Picnic Area, Blackbutts Lookout and Picnic Area, and Bar Mountain Picnic Area.

Price Range

$8 fee for day-use plus overnight camping fee

Toonumbar National Park

Toonumbar National Park is located in the Richmond Range and contains two World Heritage listed rain forests, the Murray Scrub and the Dome Mountain Forest. The region is noted for its unique and complex natural environment which protects several species of threatened plants and animals.

Afterlee Road from Kyogle provides the most reliable access for standard (2WD) vehicles to the Iron Pot Creek picnic and camping area. Please note that the Murray Scrub Road north of Iron Pot Creek is closed to all vehicles and after heavy rains all roads in the park may be closed to all vehicles.